Across The News

Archive for mars 2011

After the disaster in Japan, between the earthquake, the tsunami and the nuclear, how can I not talk about it?

Well, we all know what’s happened in the country. But how communication and media used this tragedy?

 In USA, media overplayed the nuclear crisis and based all articles on the fear. Some compared the disaster to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which was considerate “totally inappropriate” by the government.

 Some presented to their audience one of the worst case scenarios: “A complete melt down could occur, spewing large amounts of radioactivity into the atmosphere, threatening the health of human and the earth’s delicate ecosystem in innumerous ways”. (Christina Villarreal).

To conclude, some media played with the mood and emotions. But illustrate and article with real chocked pictures or with a strong title, is it a good way to draw the attention?

 Some others create ads that make fun of the Japanese disaster. Their explanation:

 « We wanted to do something people had never done before and that’s use a disaster like the tsunami in Japan in an inhumane way. A brand would never do this as it wouldn’t lead to any sales but we’re students, we can do anything. » (ads of the world).

I don’t even understand how you can think about something like this. See by yourselves:

 

 

 

 

Sucessfully, we can observe that Twitter and social networking sites like facebook seed spikes in in traffic concerning the earthquake, tsunami and radiation threats in Japan and abroad. But social media is also being used in the U.S. to collect donations for relief efforts and find out whether family or friends are all right. According to the Twitter Blog, 572,000 new accounts were created on March 12, 2011, and 177 million tweets were sent.

Publicités

Have you seen those Diesel ads that extol the virtues of stupidity?

Diesel and their new ad agency Anomaly have launched a new ad campaign which includes video, print, outdoor and viral commercials. The tagline ‘Be Stupid’ declares Diesel’s new philosophy that it’s way more interesting to be stupid and gave fun than be smart and live a boring life.

Despite the promotion winning some awards, the ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) have judged that this new campaign, showing women in bikinis (an example among others more shocking…) is unsuitable to be seen by children. Diesel argued there was nothing within the content of the ads that was offensive and that they did not contain any provocative nudity beyond the usual amounts shown in many swimwear, sportswear or lingerie ads. The ASA ruled that the poster ads breached codes on “decency”.

For this campaign, Diesel asked people to contribute to an entirely new and stupid society on a remote island. Six films have been released on YouTube and Diesel Island’s website, created by Santo London and produced by Stink Digital and Landia Films.

Diesel Island’s commercial

Too stupid for you?

For those who are adventurous and have the guts to do something offbeat would love these creative ads.  For me, Diesel launched a brillant campaign encouraging people to look at things in a different way. The other thing that comes in my mind thinking about this campaign is that Diesel is going against the fashion, but through a funny way.

However, because the advertising is crazy (and sometimes judged inappropriate), it could appear as another example of how the media tries to brainwash young minds into thinking that by doing “stupid” things you’ll automatically be considered cool/sexy/artsy. And you, what do think about this new campaign?

 If being stupid is the new way to be, what could be expected from the next campaign?   

Euro RSCG is one of “the most creative advertising agency”. Founded in Paris in 1994 by Remi Babinet and Eric Tong Cuong, the agency has been responsible for some of the world’s most-awarded campaigns in recent years, including the « rollerbabies » viral for Evian, which made it into the Guinness Book of Records in 2009 after accumulating more than 45 million online views. According to Forbes magazine, the Rollerbabies “megahit” is the most viewed online ad in the history. It is true that, watching babies performing a series of increasingly skilled roller-skate stunts, set to the tune of “Rapper ‘s Delight”, is really creative. Do you think so?

Well, this time, the agency was in a new project: the year’s TED Ads Worth Spreading competition. It was among the 10 winners for its ‘Walls’ campaign, which captured people gathering in the streets and alleyways, picking up brushes to cover up their city’s grey spaces with a rainbow of colors. (the other winners were : the ‘Born of Fire’ Chrysler Super Bowl spot by Wieden+Kennedy Portland, The Chase for Intel by Venables Bells & Partners in San Francisco, ‘Infinity’ for Batelco by FP7/BAH in Bahrain).

Walls by Euro RSCG

The aim of the Ads worth Spreading is to ignite a conversation about advertising and its role within the wider culture. The contest, which was free to enter, attracted 1,000 submissions. Millions of people access its website to watch videos of numerous TED Talks given by academics, artists, scientists, entrepreneurs and so on. As a non-profit organisation, TED relies on the benevolence of commercial partners to fund universal access. Great idea, no?

I believe that Ads Worth Spreading was a real opportunity to provoke a debate about the future of advertising and to encourage agencies to be more creative for free. I think Ads Worth Spreading can help to conversation between the ad business and consumers. Capturing people gathering in the streets, Euro RSCG was enough clever to understand the importance of the relation between the ad business and consumers.

Indeed, to introduce people in the creation of it advertising was a chance to be closer to the potential clients. Also, ideas may be free, but distributing them around the world costs money, especially when the audience is in the many millions. And the best chance of attracting the audience is if the ads evoke emotions, make you think, make you respond, make you want to share. They should amplify your passion, and make you feel concerned.

The top-10 winners receive a featured dedicated page in Ted.com’s winner’s gallery. And if you want to watch the ads their ads will also appear on YouTube’s homepage and they will receive an ad on Ted.com.

Born of Fire by Wieden+Kennedy Portland